Commands by davidpotter42 (1)

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Sort files in folders alphabetically
Creates one letter folders in the current directory and moves files with corresponding initial in the folder.

Quick directory bookmarks
Set a bookmark as normal shell variable $ p=/cumbersome/path/to/project To go there $ to p This saves one "$" and is faster to type ;-) The variable is still useful as such: $ vim $p/ will expand the variable (at least in bash) and show a list of files to edit. If setting the bookmarks is too much typing you could add another function $ bm() { eval $1=$(pwd); } then bookmark the current directory with $ bm p

Find the package that installed a command

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments. This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
Little faster alternative.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

view the system memory in clear text
see what's in your memory right now... sometimes you find passwords, account numbers and url's that were recently used. Anyone have a safe command to clear the memory without rebooting?

Use colordiff in side-by-side mode, and with automatic column widths.
Barely worth posting because it is so simple, but I use it literally all the time. I was always frustrated by the limitations that a non-gui environment imposes on diff'ing files. This fixes some of those limitations by colourising the output (you'll have to install colordiff, but it is just a wrapper for diff itself), using side-by-side mode for clearer presentation, and of course, the -W parameter, using tput to automatically insert you terminal width. Note that the double quotes aren't necessary if typed into terminal as-is. I included them for safety sake,

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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