Commands by davidwhthomas (1)

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Click on a GUI window and show its process ID and command used to run the process
This command is useful when you want to know what process is responsible for a certain GUI application and what command you need to issue to launch it in terminal.

FInd the 10 biggest files taking up disk space
This combines the above two command into one. Note that you can leave off the last two commands and simply run the command as "find /home/ -type f -exec du {} \; 2>/dev/null | sort -n | tail -n 10" The last two commands above just convert the output into human readable format.

Both view and pipe the file without saving to disk
This is a cool trick to view the contents of the file on /dev/pts/0 (or whatever terminal you're using), and also send the contents of that file to another program by way of an unnamed pipe. All the while, you've not bothered saving any extra data to disk, like you might be tempted to do with sed or grep to filter output.

ruby one-liner to get the current week number

Short Information about loaded kernel modules
I modify 4077 and marssi commandline to simplify it and skip an error when parsing the first line of lsmod (4077). Also, it's more concise and small now. I skip using xargs ( not required here ). This is only for GNU sed. For thoses without GNU sed, use that : $ modinfo $(lsmod | awk 'NR>1 {print $1}') | sed -e '/^dep/s/$/\n/g' -e '/^file/b' -e '/^desc/b' -e '/^dep/b' -e d

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Create a single-use TCP proxy with debug output to stderr
or you can add "-x" to get a typical hexdump like output

An alarm clock using xmms2 and at
I like the order of the arguments better this way.

Show how old your linux OS installtion is
..not guaranteed to always be accurate but fun to see how old you Linux installation is based on the root partitions file system creation date.

Mount a VMware virtual disk (.vmdk) file on a Linux box
Assumes XP/2000/2003. For Server 2008+ try offset=105,906,176 You can find this number in the System Information utility under Partition Starting Offset. UEFI based boxes you want partition 2 since the first is just the boot files (and FAT). This works with (storage side) snapshots which is handy for single file restores on NFS mounted VMware systems


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