Commands by daws (1)

  • This command will dump a database on a remote stream to stdout, compress it, stream it to your local machine, decompress it and put it into a file called database.sql.You could even pipe it into mysql on your local machine to restore it immediately. I had to use this recently because the server I needed a backup from didn't have enough disk space.


    8
    ssh user@host "mysqldump -h localhost -u mysqluser -pP@$$W3rD databasename | gzip -cf" | gunzip -c > database.sql
    daws · 2009-10-05 00:57:51 3

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