Commands by dcointrade (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Find ASCII files and extract IP addresses

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Get names of files in /dev, a USB device is attached to
This command lists the names of your USB devices connected and what file in /dev they are using. It's pretty useful if you don't have an automount option in your desktop or you don't have any graphical enviroment.

Clear current session history (bash)

Get full directory path of a script regardless of where it is run from
Also resolves symlinks, showing the full path of the link target

How many files in the current directory ?
A simple "ls" lists files *and* directories. So we need to "find" the files (type 'f') only. As "find" is recursive by default we must restrict it to the current directory by adding a maximum depth of "1". If you should be using the "zsh" then you can use the dot (.) as a globbing qualifier to denote plain files: zsh> ls *(.) | wc -l for more info see the zsh's manual on expansion and substitution - "man zshexpn".

grep -v with multiple patterns.
You can use -e to pass multiple patterns.

Access folder "-"
If you try to access cd - you go to the last folder you were in.

flip faster and more precisely through commands saved in history
flip shell history with PG UP/PG DOWN like with arrows. just type ss and PG UP and see all ssh commands, type ls and PG DOWN - see all ls commands. need to uncomment two options in /etc/inputrc: "\e[5~": history-search-backward "\e[6~": history-search-forward hack found: http://broddlit.wordpress.com/2008/04/12/making-the-bash-history-a-better-place/

delay: a simple scheduler
the "delay" utility is an invaluable tool for me. with gnu-screen it allows you to schedule something and have it run and output to the current terminal, unlike "at". You can also use it like "sleep" with seconds and also with date: delay until 13:33 friday && echo test get it from: http://onegeek.org/~tom/software/delay/current/delay.c (author: Tom Rothamel)


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