Commands by dddddsadasdasd (5)

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Disable system bell in an X session
Execute this command in a terminal to disable the system-bell during X-session lifetime.

Fast file backup
This is a BASH feature. The above command will create a backup of "filename" called "filename.DATE", where DATE is the actual day in %Y%m%d (year, month and day numbers together) format.

FizzBuzz one-liner in Python
A common programming question for interviewers to ask potential job candidates is to code "FizzBuzz". That is, if a number is divisible by 3, then it should display "Fizz". If a number is divisible by 5, it should display "Buzz". If it is divisible by both, then it should display "FizzBuzz". Otherwise, display the current number between 1 and 100.

Installing debian on fedora (chrooted)

Get all IPs via ifconfig
The initial version of this command also outputted extra empty lines, so it went like this: 192.168.166.48 127.0.0.1 This happened on Ubuntu, i haven't tested on anything else.

guitar synthesizer in one line of C
outputs a f=220Hz guitar string sound (fifth string A) needs ALSA

Ease your directory exploration
Usage : tt [OCCURRENCE] tt will display a tree from your actual path tt .svn will display only line containing .svn

Continually monitor things
You can use this one-liner for a quick and dirty (more customizable) alternative to the watch command. The keys to making this work: everything exists in an infinite loop; the loop starts with a clear; the loop ends with a sleep. Enter whatever you'd like to keep an eye on in the middle.

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
Scrap everything and use `gawk` to do all the magic, since it's like the future or something. $ gawk 'match($11, /[a-z]{3}$/) && match($9, /^ata-/) { gsub("../", ""); print $11,"\t",$9 }' Yank out only ata- lines that have a drive letter (ignore lines with partitions). Then strip ../../ and print the output. Yay awk. Be sure to see the alternatives as my initial command is listed there. This one is a revision of the original.

Switch 2 characters on a command line.
If you typed 'sl', put the cursor on the 'l' and hit ctrl-t to get 'ls'.


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