Commands by dfang (0)

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Ruby - nslookup against a list of IP`s or FQDN`s
This version uses host and no ruby.

Averaging columns of numbers
This example calculates the averages of column one and column two of "file.dat". It can be easily modified if other columns are to be averaged.

Watch contents of a file grow
In this case, I'm keeping an eye on /var/log/messages, but of course any file will do. When I'm following a file, I generally don't want to see anything other than what has been added due to the command or service I've executed. This keeps everything clean and tidy for troubleshooting.

draw rhomb

Clean the /boot directory
On Fedora clean the boot directory; erase older kernel

Print text string vertically, one character per line.
Define a function $ vert () { echo $1 | grep -o '.'; } Use it to print some column headers $ paste

pass the output of some command to a new email in the default email client
This depends on 'stripansi' and 'urlencode' commands, which exist on my system as these aliases: $ alias stripansi='perl -ple "s/\033\[(?:\d*(?:;\d+)*)*m//g;"' $ alias urlencode='perl -MURI::Escape -ne "\$/=\"\"; print uri_escape \$_"' The `open` command handles URLs on a Mac. Substitute the equivalent for your system (perhaps gnome-open). I don't use system `mail`, so I have this aliased as `mail` and use it this way: $ git show head | mail

Find Files That Exceed a Specified Size Limit

Calculate 1**2 + 2**2 + 3**2 + ...

loop over a set of items that contain spaces
If you want to operate on a set of items in Bash, and at least one of them contains spaces, the `for` loop isn't going to work the way you might expect. For example, if the current dir has two files, named "file" and "file 2", this would loop 3 times (once each for "file", "file", and "2"): $ for ITEM in `ls`; do echo "$ITEM"; done Instead, use a while loop with `read`: $ ls | while read ITEM; do echo "$ITEM"; done


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