Commands by dhbarr (0)

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Print a monthly calendar with today's date highlighted
The cal command is handy, but sometimes you want to quickly see today's date highlighted. That's why I came up with this quick command. Much like http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1342/show-this-months-calendar-with-todays-date-highlighted but cleaner and more succinct.

rsync over ssh via non-default ssh port
tested on cygwin and Fedora 9 . good to remember for those jobs where you cannot set a site-specific connect option in your ~/.ssh/config file.

quickly backup or copy a file with bash
less symbols, tab completion. including # export SIMPLE_BACKUP_SUFFIX="_`date +%F`" in your .bashrc provides you to easily timestamp your files

Save the list of all available commands in your box to a file
When you press TAB twice in your prompt, bash tells you something like "Display all 4567 possibilities? (y or n)" But when you press "y" you only get the list in the terminal output and, if you want to save it to a file, you have to copy it by hand from the vterm screen. With this utility you save the list to a file or pipe it to another command at will You can use the file saved list to grep for a particular pattern, useful if you are searching for a command but you only remember a few letters

I finally found out how to use notify-send with at or cron
The simplest way to do it. Works for me, at least. (Why are the variables being set?)

A DESTRUCTIVE command to render a drive unbootable
Overwrites the boot sector. Since this doesn't overwrite any data, you can usually recover by re-creating the partition table exactly the same as before you zeroed it. This can also help sometimes if you install a new drive in a Windows machine which can't read it.

List all process running a specfic port
List all process running a specfic port

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Efficiently extract lines between markers
GNU Sed can 'address' between two regex, but it continues parsing through to the end of the file. This slight alteration causes it to terminate reading the input file once the STOP match is made. In my example I have included an extra '/START/d' as my 'start' marker line contains the 'stop' string (I'm extracting data between 'resets' and using the time stamp as the 'start'). My previous coding using grep is slightly faster near the end of the file, but overall (extracting all the reset cycles in turn) the new SED method is quicker and a lot neater.

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).


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