Commands by dytto123 (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Get Futurama quotations from slashdot.org servers

Get the total length of time in hours:minutes:seconds (HH:MM:SS) of all video (or audio) in the current dir (and below)
change the *.avi to whatever you want to match, you can remove it altogether if you want to check all files.

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

type partial command, kill this command, check something you forgot, yank the command, resume typing.
Example : $ vim /etc/fstab ## damn $ $ sudo ## like a boss. Example 2 : $ sudo vim /root/bin/ ##uh... autocomplete doesn't work... $ $ sudo ls /root/bin ##ah! that's the name of the file! $ sudo vim /root/bin/ ##resume here! Thanks readline!

Filter the output of a file continously using tail and grep
The OPs solution will work, however on some systems (bsd), grep will not filter the data, unless the --line-buffered option is enabled.

Determine command type (alias, keyword, function, builtin, or file)
Prints a string indicating whether a command is an alias, keyword, function, builtin, or file. I have used this in my BASH scripts to allow an external parameter to define which function to run, and ensure that it is a valid function that can indeed be run.

reverse-i-search: Search through your command line history
"What it actually shows is going to be dependent on the commands you've previously entered. When you do this, bash looks for the last command that you entered that contains the substring "ls", in my case that was "lsof ...". If the command that bash finds is what you're looking for, just hit Enter to execute it. You can also edit the command to suit your current needs before executing it (use the left and right arrow keys to move through it). If you're looking for a different command, hit Ctrl+R again to find a matching command further back in the command history. You can also continue to type a longer substring to refine the search, since searching is incremental. Note that the substring you enter is searched for throughout the command, not just at the beginning of the command." - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/using-bash-history-more-efficiently

list files recursively by size

Copy data using gtar
It copies the entire current working directory to the destination directory with compression enabled.

Find files with the same names in several directories.
cat file1 file2 file3|sort|uniq -d finds the same lines in several files, especially in files with lists of files.


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