Commands by eleffie (2)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Mortality Countdown
watch the seconds of your life tick away - replace YYYY-mm-dd HH:MM:ss w/ your birthtime.

Prints per-line contribution per author for a GIT repository
Figures out total line contribution per author for an entire GIT repo. Includes binary files, which kind of mess up the true count. If crashes or takes too long, mess with the ls-file option at the start: git ls-files -x "*pdf" -x "*psd" -x "*tif" to remove really random binary files git ls-files "*.py" "*.html" "*.css" to only include specific file types Based off my original SVN version: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2787/prints-total-line-count-contribution-per-user-for-an-svn-repository

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Suppress output of loud commands you don't want to hear from
Suppresses all output to /dev/null. This could be expanded to check for a -l command line option to log the stderr to a file maybe -l file or -l to log to default quietly.log. I'm finding that I use it more often than one would think.

count how many cat processes are running
'ps ax' provides the fill list of running processes. 'grep -c [c]at' will find all processes that match 'cat' without matching itself....

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Display your ${PATH}, one directory per line
This works in bash and zsh. You may also want to alias it, if you need to look at it often... $ alias lpath="echo \$PATH | tr : \\\\n" "\$PATH" to make sure to look at your current $PATH

set history file length
set how many commands to keep in history Default is 500 Saved in /home/$USER/.bash_history Add this to /home/$USER/.bashrc HISTFILESIZE=1000000000 HISTSIZE=1000000

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
This command tell you if your hardware is 32 or 64 bits even if you install a 32bits OS on a 64 bits hardware. If your distro don't support the -q switch, try doing : $ grep &>/dev/null '\' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits


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