Commands by emmavelson (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Show what a given user has open using lsof

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

extract email addresses from some file (or any other pattern)

Show changed files, ignoring permission, date and whitespace changes
Only shows files with actual changes to text (excluding whitespace). Useful if you've messed up permissions or transferred in files from windows or something like that, so that you can get a list of changed files, and clean up the rest.

script broadcast-pppoe-discover

List files older than one year, exluding those in the .snapshot directory
Useful when you want to cron a daily deletion task in order to keep files not older than one year. The command excludes .snapshot directory to prevent backup deletion. One can append -delete to this command to delete the files : $ find /path/to/directory -not \( -name .snapshot -prune \) -type f -mtime +365 -delete

get some information about the parent process from a given process

create random numbers within range for conjob usage
if you need to install cron jobs in a given time range.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Search for a single file and go to it
This command looks for a single file named emails.txt which is located somewhere in my home directory and cd to that directory. This command is especially helpful when the file is burried deep in the directory structure. I tested it against the bash shells in Xubuntu 8.10 and Mac OS X Leopard 10.5.6


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