Commands by episodeiv (1)

  • Put it into your sh startup script (I use alias scpresume='rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh' in bash). When a file transfer via scp has aborted, just use scpresume instead of scp and rsync will copy only the parts of the file that haven't yet been transmitted. Show Sample Output


    14
    rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh SOURCE DESTINATION
    episodeiv · 2009-02-16 16:22:10 3

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