Commands by espider1 (1)

  • The command creates an alias called 'path', so it's useful to add it to your .profile or .bash_profile. The path command then prints the full path of any file, directory, or list of files given. Soft links will be resolved to their true location. This is especially useful if you use scp often to copy files across systems. Now rather then using pwd to get a directory, and then doing a separate cut and paste to get a file's name, you can just type 'path file' and get the full path in one operation. Show Sample Output


    1
    alias path="/usr/bin/perl -e 'use Cwd; foreach my \$file (@ARGV) {print Cwd::abs_path(\$file) .\"\n\" if(-e \$file);}'"
    espider1 · 2012-01-18 01:40:05 1

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