Commands by esplinter (3)

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List bash functions defined in .bash_profile or .bashrc
If you issue the "set" command, you'll see a list of variables and functions. This command displays just those functions' names.

Reverse SSH
this command from the source server and this follow in the destination server: ssh user@localhost -p 8888

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

A function to find the newest file in a directory
Works recusivley in the specified dir or '.' if none given. Repeatedly calls 'find' to find a newer file, when no newer files exist you have the newest. In this case 'newest' means most recently modified. To find the most recently created change -newer to -cnewer.

Extract title from HTML files
previous version leaves lots of blank lines

command line to optimize all table from a mysql database

which procs have $PATH_REGEX open?
faster than lsof by at least x2 on my box.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

32 bits or 64 bits?

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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