Commands by esplinter (3)

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Print all the lines between 10 and 20 of a file
Subtly different to the -n+p method... and probably wrong in so many ways....... But it's shorter. Just.

Display email addresses that have been sent to by a postfix server since the last mail log rollover
This assumes your mail log is /var/log/mail.log

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Produce a pseudo random password with given length in base 64

diff the outputs of two programs
I've been looking for this for a long time. Does anybody know how to do this in dash (POSIX shell)? An alternative version might be: $ exiftool img_1.jpg | diff -

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

move contents of the current directory to the parent directory, then remove current directory.
I think this is less resource consuming than the previous examples

ascii digital clock
# ### ### # # ### ### # # # ## # # ### # # # # ### ## # # # # # # ### # # # # ### # # # # # ### ##### # # ##### # # # ### # # ### # # # # # ### # # ### # # ##### ### ### # ##### ### ##### #

Change pidgin status
Changes pidgin status using its dbus interface. The status code can be obtained using command #4543.

Create a local compressed tarball from remote host directory
The command uses ssh(1) to get to a remote host, uses tar(1) to archive a remote directory, prints the result to STDOUT, which is piped to gzip(1) to compress to a local file. In other words, we are archiving and compressing a remote directory to our local box.


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