Commands by essayhelp (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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generate a telephone keypad
seems a useless command ...

Disable beep sound from your computer
This command will disable the beep sound from the PC speaker.

USE WITH CAUTION: perminately delete old kernel packages

Converts all windows .URL shortcuts in a directory to linux (gnome) .desktop shortcuts

revert a committed change in SVN
This command can be used to revert a particular changeset in the local copy. I find this useful because I frequently import files into the wrong directory. After the import it says "Committed revision 123" or similar. to revert this change in the working copy do: svn merge -c -123 . (don't forget the .) and then commit.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show which process is blocking umount (Device or resource is busy)
Instead of using force un-mounting, it's better to find the processes that currently use the relevant folder. Taken from: http://www.linuxhowtos.org/Tips%20and%20Tricks/findprocesses.htm

search ubuntu packages to find which package contains the executable program programname
search ubuntu's remote package source repositories for a specific program to see which package contains it

colorize comm output
It just colorizes the line based on if it has 0, 1 or 2 tabs at the beginning of the line. Won't work so well if lines already begin with tabs (too bad comm doesn't have an option to substitute \t for something else). Don't forget comm needs input files to be sorted. You can use a shortcut like this with bash: comm

shows history of logins on the server
outputs a history of logins on the server (top 10, when piped to 'head'); optional flags: '-a' put the hostname at the end of the line (good for long hostnames), '-i' post the IP instead of the hostname, '-F' put the full login and logout times, rather than short times.


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