Commands by evil (4)

  • I wrote this a long time ago, wondering why this wasn't floating around somewhere out there (at least not where I could find).. this seems much more simple than multiple aliases and can cd out of directories easier. Show Sample Output


    9
    up() { local x='';for i in $(seq ${1:-1});do x="$x../"; done;cd $x; }
    evil · 2012-05-16 04:21:41 1
  • This will make a false directory with the same file names as whatever directory you choose. This is wise to use when testing scripts that alter contents, filenames, or move files. I wrote this after an OOPS I made when renaming a directory of JPGs, PNGs, PSDs that were mixed. I recommend this as I lost over 2000 vacation pictures and some graphics I designed for software and web sites. :( NOTE: This only creates name copies, that data itself is not copied.


    1
    for each in /usr/bin/*; do echo $each | sed 's/\/usr\/bin\///' | xargs touch; done
    evil · 2011-10-13 19:14:34 0
  • This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh. 1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands. 2. Run the command 3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command 4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is. 5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander 6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer. Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner). Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.


    0
    while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
    evil · 2010-06-15 01:20:27 1
  • Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander lol


    2
    while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
    evil · 2010-06-13 18:45:02 3

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Find the package that installed a command

Do quick arithmetic on numbers from STDIN with any formatting using a perl one liner.
Good for summing the numbers embedded in text - a food journal entry for example with calories listed per food where you want the total calories. Use this to monitor and keep a total on anything that ouputs numbers.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

a function to create a box of '=' characters around a given string.
First argument: string to put a box around. Second argument: character to use for box (default is '=') Same as command #4962, cleaned up, shortened, and more efficient. Now a ' * ' can be used as the box character, and the variables get unset so they don't mess with anything else you might have. They marked c++ as a function for this command, but I'm not sure why. Must be a bug.

lists files and folders in a folder
lists files and folders in a folder with summary.

To find the uptime of each process-id of particular service or process

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

View all new log messages in real time with color

rsync instead of scp
The command copies a file from remote SSH host on port 8322 with bandwidth limit 100KB/sec; --progress shows a progress bar --partial turns partial download on; thus, you can resume the process if something goes wrong --bwlimit limits bandwidth by specified KB/sec --ipv4 selects IPv4 as preferred I find it useful to create the following alias: alias myscp='rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4' in ~/.bash_aliases, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login or ~/.bashrc where appropriate.

Make a ready-only filesystem ?writeable? by unionfs
First look into /etc/modules if you have unionfs (or squashfs) support. If not, add the modules. UnionFS combines two filesystems. If there is a need to write a file, /tmp/unioncache will be used to write files (first create that directory). Reads will be done where the file is found first. http://tldp.org/HOWTO/SquashFS-HOWTO/creatingandusing.html


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