Commands by evil (4)

  • I wrote this a long time ago, wondering why this wasn't floating around somewhere out there (at least not where I could find).. this seems much more simple than multiple aliases and can cd out of directories easier. Show Sample Output


    9
    up() { local x='';for i in $(seq ${1:-1});do x="$x../"; done;cd $x; }
    evil · 2012-05-16 04:21:41 1
  • This will make a false directory with the same file names as whatever directory you choose. This is wise to use when testing scripts that alter contents, filenames, or move files. I wrote this after an OOPS I made when renaming a directory of JPGs, PNGs, PSDs that were mixed. I recommend this as I lost over 2000 vacation pictures and some graphics I designed for software and web sites. :( NOTE: This only creates name copies, that data itself is not copied.


    1
    for each in /usr/bin/*; do echo $each | sed 's/\/usr\/bin\///' | xargs touch; done
    evil · 2011-10-13 19:14:34 0
  • This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh. 1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands. 2. Run the command 3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command 4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is. 5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander 6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer. Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner). Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.


    0
    while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
    evil · 2010-06-15 01:20:27 1
  • Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander lol


    2
    while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
    evil · 2010-06-13 18:45:02 4

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Nicely display permissions in octal format with filename
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Get absolut path to your bash-script
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Monitor dynamic changes in the dmesg log.
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Check your hard drive for bad blocks (destructive)
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list files recursively by size

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Unlock your VMS to avoid problems after some failed tasks ended.

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Quickly analyze apache logs for top 25 most common IP addresses.
This command is much quicker than the alternative of "sort | uniq -c | sort -n".

An alias to re-run last command with sudo. Similar to "sudo !!"
I didn't come up with this myself, but I always add this to my .bash_aliases file. It's essentially the same idea as running "sudo !!" except it's much easier to type. (You can't just alias "sudo !!", it doesn't really work for reasons I don't understand.) "fc" is a shell built-in for editing and re-running previous commands. The -l flag tells it to display the line rather than edit it, and the -n command tells it to omit the line number. -1 tells it to print the previous line. For more detail: $help fc


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