Commands by evil (4)

  • I wrote this a long time ago, wondering why this wasn't floating around somewhere out there (at least not where I could find).. this seems much more simple than multiple aliases and can cd out of directories easier. Show Sample Output


    9
    up() { local x='';for i in $(seq ${1:-1});do x="$x../"; done;cd $x; }
    evil · 2012-05-16 04:21:41 1
  • This will make a false directory with the same file names as whatever directory you choose. This is wise to use when testing scripts that alter contents, filenames, or move files. I wrote this after an OOPS I made when renaming a directory of JPGs, PNGs, PSDs that were mixed. I recommend this as I lost over 2000 vacation pictures and some graphics I designed for software and web sites. :( NOTE: This only creates name copies, that data itself is not copied.


    1
    for each in /usr/bin/*; do echo $each | sed 's/\/usr\/bin\///' | xargs touch; done
    evil · 2011-10-13 19:14:34 0
  • This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh. 1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands. 2. Run the command 3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command 4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is. 5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander 6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer. Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner). Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.


    0
    while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
    evil · 2010-06-15 01:20:27 1
  • Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander lol


    2
    while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
    evil · 2010-06-13 18:45:02 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Remove color codes (special characters) with sed
Removes ANSI color and end of line codes to the [{attr1};...;{attrn}m format.

Salvage a borked terminal
This works in some situations where 'reset' and the other alternatives don't.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Create a zip archive excluding all SVN folders

Fast, built-in pipe-based data sink
This is shorter and actually much faster than >/dev/null (see sample output for timings) Plus, it looks like a disappointed face emoticon.

pretend to be busy in office to enjoy a cup of coffee
Create a progress dialog with custom title and text using zenity.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Substitute spaces in filename with underscore
Substitute spaces in filename with underscore, it work on the first space encountered.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Replace spaces in a file with hyphens


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: