Commands by fengling (0)

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MoscowML with editable input-line and history
Works also with SML/NJ and other interpreters or tools with interactive environments.

Print the last modified file

Title Case Files
All words of the filenames except "a", "of", "that" and "to" are capitalized. To also match words which begin with a specific string, you can use this: $ rename 's/\b((?!hello\b|t)[a-z]+)/\u$1/g' * This will capitalize all words except "hello" and words beginning with "t".

LIST FILENAMES OF FILES CREATED TODAY IN CURRENT DIRECTORY
Then pipe to 'xargs ls' for a familiar listing, possibly using find's -print0 and xarg's -0 options.

List your MACs address
List all MAC addresses on a Linux box. sort -u is useful when having virtual interfaces.

Delete specific remote 'origin' branch 'gh-pages'

Find the package that installed a command

Ultimate current directory usage command
A little bit smaller, faster and should handle files with special characters in the name.

VIM: Replace a string with an incrementing number between marks 'a and 'b (eg, convert string ZZZZ to 1, 2, 3, ...)

Find ulimit values of currently running process
When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while $ ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: $ ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process.


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