Commands by flokra (5)

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delay execution of a command that needs lots of memory and CPU time until the resources are available
[ 2000 -ge "$(free -m | awk '/buffers.cache:/ {print $4}')" ] returns true if less than 2000 MB of RAM are available, so adjust this number to your needs. [ $(echo "$(uptime | awk '{print $10}' | sed -e 's/,$//' -e 's/,/./') >= $(grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo)" | bc) -eq 1 ] returns true if the current machine load is at least equal to the number of CPUs. If either of the tests returns true we wait 10 seconds and check again. If both tests return false, i.e. 2GB are available and machine load falls below number of CPUs, we start our command and save it's output in a text file. The ( ( ... ) & ) construct lets the command run in background even if we log out. See http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3115/ .

Get your external IP address ( 10 characters long )
Shortest url to a external IP-service, 10 characters.

Update twitter with Perl
Requires Net::Twitter. Just replace the double quoted strings with the appropriate info.

nmap IP block and autogenerate comprehensive Nagios service checks
More info here: http://nagioswiki.com/wiki/index.php/Autocreating_Nagios_Configuration_with_Nmap_and_Nmap2Nagios.pl

Copy files to a remote host with SFTP with a leading dot, then rename them to the real file name
Usage: $ sftp-cp * | sftp user@host:/dir This is useful if there is a process on the remote machine waiting for files in an incoming directory. This way it won't see half-transmitted files if it ignores hidden files.

Edit 2 or more files in vim using vim -d
Is this not the same

Kill a broken ssh connection
This is useful for example if you are on ssh in a server and the server goes down without letting you out. This is part of a larget sets of escape sequences provided by ssh. You can find them with ~? Here's the list: ~. - terminate connection (and any multiplexed sessions) ~B - send a BREAK to the remote system ~C - open a command line ~R - request rekey ~V/v - decrease/increase verbosity (LogLevel) ~^Z - suspend ssh ~# - list forwarded connections ~& - background ssh (when waiting for connections to terminate) ~? - this message ~~ - send the escape character by typing it twice (Note that escapes are only recognized immediately after newline.)

Replace spaces in filename
This command will replace spaces in filename with underscore, for all file in directory that contain spaces.

Remove all zero size files from current directory (not recursive)

Swap the two last arguments of the current command line
Say you just typed a long command like this: $ rsync -navupogz --delete /long/path/to/dir_a /very/long/path/to/dir_b but you really want to sync dir_b to dir_a. Instead of rewriting all the command line, just type followed by , and your command line will read $ rsync -navupogz --delete /very/long/path/to/dir_b /long/path/to/dir_a


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