Commands by fnds (1)

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Create a persistent remote Proxy server through an SSH channel
Create a persistent remote Proxy server through an SSH channel.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

In-Place search/replace with datestamped backup
Does an in situ search-replace but leaves a datestamped backup. A variation with more precision: sed -i.`date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S 's/pattern/replace' [filename]

Super Speedy Hexadecimal or Octal Calculations and Conversions to Decimal.
^Hexadecimal Ten minus Octal Ten is Eight(in Decimal). $ echo "$(( 0xaf )) = $(( 0257 ))" ^Hexadecimal AF and Octal 257 are both Decimal 175.

Top ten (or whatever) memory utilizing processes (with children aggregate) - Can be done without the multi-dimensional array

send DD a signal to print its progress
every 1sec sends DD the USR1 signal which causes DD to print its progress.

draw matrix using dot

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

git remove files which have been deleted
I've used technicalpickles command a lot, but this one handles whitespaces in filenames. I'm sure you want to create an alias for it :)

Bash prompt with user name, host, history number, current dir and just a touch of color
I put that line in my .bash_profile (OS X) and .bashrc (Linux). Here is a summary of what the \char means: n=new line, u=user name, h=host, !=history number, w=current work directory The \[\e[32m\] sequence set the text to bright green and \[\e[0m\] returns to normal color. For more information on what you can set in your bash prompt, google 'bash prompt'


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