Commands by fzero (4)

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Create a zip archive excluding all SVN folders

Test a serial connection
If the connection works you should see a "hello" on host A. If not: check your cabeling etc :-)

find distro name / release version

va - alias for editing aliases
When setting up a new aliases file, or having creating a new file.. About every time after editing an aliases file, I source it. This alias makes editing alias a bit easier and they are useful right away. Note if the source failed, it will not echo "aliases sourced". Sub in vi for your favorite editor, or alter for ksh, sh, etc.

Burst a Single PDF Document into Single Pages and Report its Data to doc_data.txt
Require the pdftk package It ll split each page in your pdf file , into a new pdf file and report info on doc_data.txt

copy timestamps of files from one location to another - useful when file contents are already synced but timestamps are wrong.
Sometimes when copying files from one place to another, the timestamps get lost. Maybe you forgot to add a flag to preserve timestamps in your copy command. You're sure the files are exactly the same in both locations, but the timestamps of the files in the new home are wrong and you need them to match the source. Using this command, you will get a shell script (/tmp/retime.sh) than you can move to the new location and just execute - it will change the timestamps on all the files and directories to their previous values. Make sure you're in the right directory when you launch it, otherwise all the touch commands will create new zero-length files with those names. Since find's output includes "." it will also change the timestamp of the current directory. Ideally rsync would be the way to handle this - since it only sends changes by default, there would be relatively little network traffic resulting. But rsync has to read the entire file contents on both sides to be sure no bytes have changed, potentially causing a huge amount of local disk I/O on each side. This could be a problem if your files are large. My approach avoids all the comparison I/O. I've seen comments that rsync with the "--size-only" and "--times" options should do this also, but it didn't seem to do what I wanted in my test. With my approach you can review/edit the output commands before running them, so you can tell exactly what will happen. The "tee" command both displays the output on the screen for your review, AND saves it to the file /tmp/retime.sh. Credit: got this idea from Stone's answer at http://serverfault.com/questions/344731/rsync-copying-over-timestamps-only?rq=1, and combined it into one line.

extract email adresses from some file (or any other pattern)
This will catch most separators in the section of the email: dot . dash - underscore _ plus + (added for gmail) ... and the basic dash '-' of host names.

Insert a line for each n lines

use google's text-to-speech and play in media player

remove password from openssl key file
Strip a password from a openssl key to use with apache httpd server


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