Commands by ginochen (2)


  • 1
    genRandomText() { local n=$1; while [ $((n--)) -gt 0 ]; do printf "\x$(printf %x $((RANDOM % 26 + 65)))" ; done ; echo ; }
    ginochen · 2018-06-27 01:04:45 0
  • I removed the dependency of the English language Show Sample Output


    5
    for y in $(seq 1996 2018); do echo -n "$y -> "; for m in $(seq 1 12); do NDATE=$(date --date "$y-$m-13" +%w); if [ $NDATE -eq 5 ]; then PRINTME=$(date --date "$y-$m-13" +%B);echo -n "$PRINTME "; fi; done; echo; done
    ginochen · 2018-06-25 09:20:57 1

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