Commands by gnpf (1)

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Quickly (soft-)reboot skipping hardware checks
If you are doing some tests which require reboots (e. g. startup skripts, kernel module parameters, ...), this is very time intensive, if you have got a hardware with a long pre-boot phase due to hardware checks. At this time, kexec can help, which only restarts the kernel with all related stuff. First the kernel to be started is loaded, then kexec -e jumps up to start it. Is as hard as a reboot -f, but several times faster (e. g. 1 Minute instead of 12 on some servers here).

Go to parent directory of filename edited in last command

Fix Ubuntu's Broken Sound Server
Ever since the switch to pulseaudio, Ubuntu users including myself have found themselves with no sound intermittently. To fix this, just use this command and restarts firefox or mplayer or whatever.

Making scripts runs on backgourd and logging output
Save all output to a log.

Find out how much data is waiting to be written to disk
Ever ask yourself "How much data would be lost if I pressed the reset button?" Scary, isn't it?

Parallel mysql dump restore
this command works with one gziped file per table, and restore 4 tables in parallel.

quick input
Insert the last argument to the previous command

Sum file sizes

tar via network

archive all files containing local changes (svn)
Create a tgz archive of all the files containing local changes relative to a subversion repository. Add the '-q' option to only include files under version control: $svn st -q | cut -c 8- | sed 's/^/\"/;s/$/\"/' | xargs tar -czvf ../backup.tgz Useful if you are not able to commit yet but want to create a quick backup of your work. Of course if you find yourself needing this it's probably a sign you should be using a branch, patches or distributed version control (git, mercurial, etc..)


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