Commands by gocoogs (2)

  • attempts to delete all local branches. git will fail on any branches not fully merged into local master, so don't worry about losing work. git will return the names of any successfully deleted branches. Find those in the output with grep, then push null repositories to the corresponding names to your target remote. assumes: - your local and remote branches are identically named, and there's nothing extra in the remote branch that you still want - EDIT: you want to keep your local master branch


    0
    git branch | cut -c3- | grep -v "^master$" | while read line; do git branch -d $line; done | grep 'Deleted branch' | awk '{print $3;}' | while read line; do git push <target_remote> :$line; done
    gocoogs · 2011-08-13 16:58:34 0
  • extracts path to each md5 checksum file, then, for each path, cd to it, check the md5sum, then cd - to toggle back to the starting directory. greps at the end to remove cd chattering on about the current directory.


    0
    for i in $(find . -name *md5checksum_file* | sed 's/\(\.\/.*\)md5checksum_file.txt/\1/'); do cd "$i"; md5sum -c "md5checksum_file.txt"; cd -; done | tee ~/checksum_results.txt | grep -v "<current directory>"
    gocoogs · 2011-05-17 01:08:44 0

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