Commands by grep (7)

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find files ignoring .svn and its decendents

dstat- this command is powerful one to monitor system activity . It has combined the power of vmstat,iostat,mpstat,df,free,sar .
As mentioned in the summery that it is a powerful command to monitor system activity in great way. It has got the power of vmstat,iostat,mpstat,df,free and sar.Instead of firing each single command separately ,one can fire one single command to get all the info at once.But there is a way to get the individual information too. Please see the man page . You can get it from here : http://dag.wieers.com/home-made/dstat/

Get a list of all TODO/FIXME tasks left to be done in your project
Place this in your .bashrc (or run it once) to set the `tasks` alias. Next time you enter `tasks` into a terminal, it will give you a list of all TODO and FIXME comments in the current directory and child directories, giving you a quick overview of what you still have to do!

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

Ask user to confirm
Returns true if user presses the key. Use it like $ Confirm "Continue" && do action

One liner to parse all epubs in a directory and use the calibre ebook-convert utility to convert them to mobi format
all ebook-convert -options are optional. all you really need to pass ebook-convert is the incoming and outgoing names, with extensions. Has been tested on Ubuntu 10.10

Convert diff output to HTML ins/del

Find and display most recent files using find and perl
This pipeline will find, sort and display all files based on mtime. This could be done with find | xargs, but the find | xargs pipeline will not produce correct results if the results of find are greater than xargs command line buffer. If the xargs buffer fills, xargs processes the find results in more than one batch which is not compatible with sorting. Note the "-print0" on find and "-0" switch for perl. This is the equivalent of using xargs. Don't you love perl? Note that this pipeline can be easily modified to any data produced by perl's stat operator. eg, you could sort on size, hard links, creation time, etc. Look at stat and just change the '9' to what you want. Changing the '9' to a '7' for example will sort by file size. A '3' sorts by number of links.... Use head and tail at the end of the pipeline to get oldest files or most recent. Use awk or perl -wnla for further processing. Since there is a tab between the two fields, it is very easy to process.

Translate your terminal into Swedish Chef
Bork, bork, bork! To keep it short, the first terminal line doesn't show a prompt.

Change tha mac adresse
eth0 = the name of the interface 00:01:02:03:04:05 = the new mac adresse the same thing for wireless card $ sudo iwconfig eth1 hw ether 00:01:02:03:04:05


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