Commands by guedesav (1)

  • This is an useful command for when your OS is reporting less free RAM than it actually has. In case terminated processes did not free their variables correctly, the previously allocated RAM might make a bit sluggis over time. This command then creates a huge file made out of zeroes and then removes it, thus freeing the amount of memory occupied by the file in the RAM. In this example, the sequence will free up to 1GB(1M * 1K) of unused RAM. This will not free memory which is genuinely being used by active processes.


    -11
    dd if=/dev/zero of=junk bs=1M count=1K
    guedesav · 2009-11-01 23:45:51 3

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