Commands by gumnos (3)

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Print all open regular files sorted by the number of file handles open to each.
This command run fine on my Ubuntu machine, but on Red Hat I had to change the awk command to `awk '{print $10}'`.

ps grep with header
Yet another ps grep function, but this one includes the column headings.

Recursively chmod all dirs to 755 and all files to 644

Gets the english pronunciation of a phrase
Usage examples: say hello say "hello world" say hello+world

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

STAT Function showing ALL info, stat options, and descriptions
This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. $ alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: $ ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'

Avoiding history file to be overwritten
If histappend options is set in bash, the file .bash_history will not be overwrite and history list is append to it.

get diskusage of files modified during the last n days
get diskusage of files (in this case logfiles in /var/log) modified during the last n days: $ sudo find /var/log/ -mtime -n -type f | xargs du -ch n -> last modified n*24 hours ago Numeric arguments can be specified as +n for greater than n, -n for less than n, n for exactly n. => so 7*24 hours (about 7 days) is -7 $ sudo find /var/log/ -mtime -7 -type f | xargs du -ch | tail -n1

Record live sound in Vorbis (eg for bootlegs or to take audio notes)
This will record the capture channel of your soundcard, directly encoded in Ogg Vorbis, in stereo at quality 5 (I'm using this to record live jam sessions from my line input). You can choose which device to capture (eg. line input, microphone or PCM output) with $ alsamixer -V capture You can do the same thing and live encode in MP3 or FLAC if you wish, just check FLAC and LAME man pages.


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