Commands by guywithnose (1)

  • This is how you can do this without having to use oneline Show Sample Output


    0
    git log | nl -w9 -v0 --body-numbering='pcommit\ [0-9a-f]\{40\}' | sed 's/^ \+\([0-9]\+\)\s\+/HEAD~\1 /'
    guywithnose · 2015-11-23 21:53:33 0

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Does a traceroute. Lookup and display the network or AS names and AS numbers.
From the man page. lft ? display the route packets take to a network host/socket using one of several layer-4 protocols and methods; optionally show heuristic network information in transitu -A Enable lookup and display of of AS (autonomous system) numbers (e.g., [1]). This option queries one of several whois servers (see options 'C' and 'r') in order to ascertain the origin ASN of the IP address in question. By default, LFT uses the pWhoIs service whose ASN data tends to be more accurate and more timely than using the RADB as it is derived from the Internet's global routing table. -N Enable lookup and display of network or AS names (e.g., [GNTY-NETBLK-4]). This option queries Prefix WhoIs, RIPE NCC, or the RADB (as requested). In the case of Prefix WhoIs or RADB, the network name is displayed. In the case of RIPE NCC, the AS name is displayed.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX

List all files in current dir and subdirs sorted by size
or $ tree -ifsF --noreport .|sort -n -k2|grep -v '/$' (rows presenting directory names become hidden)

Relocate a file or directory, but keep it accessible on the old location throug a simlink.
Used for moving stuff around on a fileserver

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Find all files currently open in Vim and/or gVim
Catches .swp, .swo, .swn, etc. If you have access to lsof, it'll give you more compressed output and show you the associated terminals (e.g., pts/5, which you could then use 'w' to figure out where it's originating from): lsof | grep '\.sw.$' If you have swp files turned off, you can do something like: ps x | grep '[g,v]im', but it won't tell you about files open in buffers, via :e [file].

Conficker Detection with NMAP

Recursively remove all empty directories

Get full from half remembered commands
Show all commands having the part known by you. Eg: $apropos pdf | less


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