Commands by hamsolo474 (2)

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strip non-constant number of directories from tar archive while decompressing
If you want to decompress the files from an archive to current directory by stripping all directory paths, use --transform option to strip path information. Unfortunately, --strip-components option is good if the target files have same and constant depth of folders. The idea was taken from http://www.unix.com/solaris/145941-how-extract-files-tar-file-without-creating-directories.html

Cap apt-get download speed
apt-get is pretty aggressive when it downloads, potentially hogging the bandwidth of your network. The 25 is in KB, change this to your needs.

Extract tar.gz file with original permission
-x, --extract, --get extract files from an archive -p, --preserve-permissions, --same-permissions extract information about file permissions (default for superuser) -f, --file=ARCHIVE use archive file or device ARCHIVE -v, --verbose verbosely list files processed

Get IP from hostname

list files recursively by size

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Efficiently print a line deep in a huge log file
Sed stops parsing at the match and so is much more effecient than piping head into tail or similar. Grab a line range using $ sed '999995,1000005!d' < my_massive_file

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

clear screen, keep prompt at eye-level (faster than clear(1), tput cl, etc.)
this leaves the cursor at the bottom of the terminal screen, where your eyes are. ctrl-l moves it to the top, forcing you to look up.

Show a curses based menu selector
Not so much handy by itself, but very nice in shell scripts. This makes you a handy ncurses based checklist. Much like terminal installers, just use the arrow keys and hit 'Space' to adjust the selections. Returns all selected tags as strings, with no newline at the end. So, your output will be something like: "one" "two" "three" "four" "etc" For those who prefer bash expansion over gratuitious typing: $ whiptail --checklist "Simple checkbox menu" 12 35 3 $(echo {one,two,three,four}" '' 0"} ) Things to note: The height must includes the outer border and padding: add 7 to however many items you want to show up at the same time. If the status is 1, it will be selected by default. anything else, will be deselected.


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