Commands by hbalagtas (1)

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Stop Flash from tracking everything you do.
Brute force way to block all LSO cookies on a Linux system with the non-free Flash browser plugin. Works just fine for my needs. Enjoy.

Advanced LS Output using Find for Formatted/Sortable File Stat info
I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable. $ find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50% 00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp The key is: # -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output. You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions. $ lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'

find both total size and number of files below any given svn directory
afaik, svn doesn't have a good, scriptable way of telling you these two basic pieces of information.

Grab the first 3 octets of your ip addresses
For machines that have many ip blocks spanning different Class C's, this will show which ones.

Recursively Find Images, Convert to JPEGS and Delete
Simple command to convert a large number of images into jpeg-format. Will delete originals after conversion.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

delete files containing matching text
-r recursively -Z zero byte after each file name instead of the usual newline -l only filenames

Pretty man pages under X
You're a developer - but it doesn't mean you have to slum it! Why not spice up your man page lookups by using a decent PDF viewer. I use 'xpdf' - maybe you prefer acroread, whatever, it's just as fast as plain dull ASCII on today's machines and you can still search for stuff - that's the main reason I use PDF and not PS.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Download and install the newest dropbox beta


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