Commands by higuita (1)

  • This command makes a small graph with the histogram of size blocks (5MB in this example), not individual files. Fine tune the 4+5*int($1/5) block for your own size jumps : jump-1+jump*($1/jump) Also in the hist=hist-5 part, tune for bigger or smaller graphs Show Sample Output


    0
    du -sm *| sort -nr | awk '{ size=4+5*int($1/5); a[size]++ }; END { print "size(from->to) number graph"; for(i in a){ printf("%d %d ",i,a[i]) ; hist=a[i]; while(hist>0){printf("#") ; hist=hist-5} ; printf("\n")}}'
    higuita · 2014-08-19 14:43:20 0

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