Commands by hileon (0)

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list files recursively by size

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Save man pages to pdf

connects to a serial console
e.g., 'screen -L /dev/ttyUSB0 38400' listens to your Holux M-241 GPS logger and turns on automatic logging

List top 10 files in filesystem or mount point bigger than 200MB
Specify the size in bytes using the 'c' option for the -size flag. The + sign reads as "bigger than". Then execute du on the list; sort in reverse mode and show the first 10 occurrences.

umount all nfs mounts on machine

statistics in one line
In this example, file contains five columns where first column is text. Variance is calculated for columns 2 - 5 by using perl module Statistics::Descriptive. There are many more statistical functions available in the module.

Block an IP address from connecting to a server
This appends (-A) a new rule to the INPUT chain, which specifies to drop all packets from a source (-s) IP address.

Convert an existing Git repo to a bare repo
If you want to turn a Git repo into the origin that folks can push to, you should make it a bare repository. See: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2199897/git-convert-normal-to-bare-repository

monitor a tail -f command with multiple processes
when using named pipes only one reader is given the output by default. Also, most commands piped to by grep use a buffer which save output until tail -f finishes, which is not convenient. Here, using a combination of tee, sub-processes and the --line-buffered switch in grep we can workaround the problem.


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