Commands by hkyeakley (2)

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grep -v with multiple patterns.
You can use -e to pass multiple patterns.

print shared library dependencies
May be used on (embedded) systems lack ldd

Use "most" as your man pager
you should have the "most" package installed. I like it because it is colorful and easier to read. alternatively you can use "less" instead of "most". you can also add this to your ~/.bashrc to make it permanent.

Revert back all files currently checked out by Perforce SCM for edit

Programmatic way to find and set your timezone
1. it find your public ip via ifconfig.io 2. than use this IP to request your timezone via worldtimeapi.org 3. and send it to the command timedatectl set-timezone

Get the full path of a bash script's Git repository head.
Rather than complicated and fragile paths relative to a script like "../../other", this command will retrieve the full path of the file's repository head. Safe with spaces in directory names. Works within a symlinked directory. Broken down: $cd "$(dirname "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}")" temporarily changes directories within this expansion. Double quoted "$(dirname" and ")" with unquoted ${BASH_SOURCE[0]} allows spaces in the path. $git rev-parse --show-toplevel gets the full path of the repository head of the current working directory, which was temporarily changed by the "cd".

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs
I removed the dependency of the English language

Convert epoch date to human readable date format in a log file.

Map the slot of an I/O card to its PCI bus address
Recent hardware may or may not enumerate *both of* these values

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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