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Cut/Copy brackets or parentheses on vim (in normal mode)
We have for example : func () { echo FOO echo BAR } Place the cursor under a bracket and press d + %. It will cut everything inside and the brackets. It let : func () You can copy text with y + %

Check which files are opened by Firefox then sort by largest size.
Just refining last proposal for this check, showing awk power to make more complex math (instead /1024/1024, 2^20). We don't need declare variable before run lsof, because $(command) returns his output. Also, awk can perform filtering by regexp instead to call grep. I changed the 0.0000xxxx messy output, with a more readable form purging all fractional numbers and files less than 1 MB.

df without line wrap on long FS name
-P uses the POSIX output format, which makes information on each file system always printed on exactly one line. "column -t" makes a table from the input.

Open Port Check
also could specify port number: lsof -ni TCP:80

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Delete leading whitespace from the start of each line

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Ext3 format Terabytes in Seconds

printing barcodes
64 elements max on 16 rows, 4 cols. GNU Barcode will adapt automagically the width and the eight of your elements to fill the page. Standard output format is PostScript.

seq can produce the same thing as Perl's ... operator.
Optionally, one can use {1..50} instead of seq. E.g. for i in {1..50} ; do echo Iteration $i ; done


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