Commands by hunterm (8)

  • Generates a password using symbols, alpha, and digits. No repeating chars. Show Sample Output


    -4
    for i in {21..79};do echo -e "\x$i";done | tr " " "\n" | shuf | tr -d "\n"
    hunterm · 2011-04-14 01:43:40 3

  • 0
    find $(echo "$PATH" | tr ':' ' ') -name "*program*"
    hunterm · 2011-01-07 22:27:44 2
  • RTFMFTW.


    39
    rtfm() { help $@ || man $@ || $BROWSER "http://www.google.com/search?q=$@"; }
    hunterm · 2011-01-05 02:53:38 2
  • Yep, now you can finally google from the command line! Here's a readable version "for your pleasure"(c): google() { # search the web using google from the commandline # syntax: google google query=$(echo "$*" | sed "s:%:%25:g;s:&:%26:g;s:+:%2b:g;s:;:%3b:g;s: :+:g") data=$(wget -qO - "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=$query") title=$(echo "$data" | tr '}' '\n' | sed "s/.*,\"titleNoFormatting//;s/\":\"//;s/\",.*//;s/\\u0026/'/g;s/\\\//g;s/#39\;//g;s/'amp;/\&/g" | head -1) url="$(echo "$data" | tr '}' '\n' | sed 's/.*"url":"//;s/".*//' | head -1)" echo "${title}: ${url} | http://www.google.com/search?q=${query}" } Enjoy :) Show Sample Output


    -7
    The command is too big to fit here. :( Look at the description for the command, in readable form! :)
    hunterm · 2011-01-05 02:45:28 1
  • The command was too long for the command box, so here it is: echo $(( `wget -qO - http://i18n.counter.li.org/ | grep 'users registered' | sed 's/.*\<font size=7\>//g' | tr '\>' ' ' | sed 's/<br.*//g' | tr ' ' '\0'` + `curl --silent http://www.dudalibre.com/gnulinuxcounter?lang=en | grep users | head -2 | tail -1 | sed 's/.*<strong>//g' | sed 's/<\/strong>.*//g'` )) This took me about an hour to do. It uses wget and curl because, dudalibre.com blocks wget, and wget worked nicely for me. Show Sample Output


    -1
    Check the Description below.
    hunterm · 2010-10-07 04:22:32 0

  • 0
    curl --silent http://www.dudalibre.com/gnulinuxcounter?lang=en | grep users | head -2 | tail -1 | sed 's/.*<strong>//g' | sed 's/<\/strong>.*//g'
    hunterm · 2010-10-07 04:12:45 0

  • -1
    wget -qO - http://i18n.counter.li.org/ | grep 'users registered' | sed 's/.*\<font size=7\>//g' | tr '\>' ' ' | sed 's/<br.*//g' | tr ' ' '\0'
    hunterm · 2010-10-07 03:19:17 0
  • Output the html from xkcd's index.html, filter out the html tags, and then view it in gwenview. Show Sample Output


    -1
    gwenview `wget -O - http://xkcd.com/ | grep 'png' | grep '<img src="http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/' | sed s/title=\".*//g | sed 's/.png\"/.png/g' | sed 's/<img src=\"//g'`
    hunterm · 2010-08-24 22:21:51 1

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Bitcoin prices from the command line

Find the package that installed a command
Put this one-line function somewhere in your shell init, re-login and try $ whatinstalled This is an elaborate wrapper around "dpkg -S", with numerous safeguards. Symlinks and command aliases are resolved. If the searched command is not an existing executable file or was installed by some other means than dpkg/apt, nothing is printed to stdout, otherwise the package name.

list files recursively by size

Add line number count as C-style comments
I often find the need to number enumerations and other lists when programming. With this command, create a new file called 'inputfile' with the text you want to number. Paste the contents of 'outputfile' back into your source file and fix the tabbing if necessary. You can also change this to output hex numbering by changing the "%02d" to "%02x". If you need to start at 0 replace "NR" with "NR-1". I adapted this from http://osxdaily.com/2010/05/20/easily-add-line-numbers-to-a-text-file/.

Tricky implementation of two-dimensional array in Bash.
Since Bash doesn't support two-dimensional arrays, you can limit your columns length by some big enough constant value ( in this example 100 ) and then index the array with i and j, or maybe write your own get() and set() methods to index the array properly like I implemented for example ( see Sample output ). For example for i=0 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [0,99] in the one-dimensional array. For i=1 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [100,199]. And so on. Be careful when using this, and remember that in fact you are always using one-dimensional array.

delete duplicate lines from a file and keep the order of the other lines
i wanted to delete all duplicate lines from .bash_history and keep the order of the other lines. the command cat's the file and adds line numbers, then sorts by the second column. afterwards uniq omits repeated lines, but skips the first field (the line number). then it sorts by the line numbers and at the end cuts the numbers off.

Wrap text files on the command-line for easy reading
fold wraps text at 80 characters wide, and with the -s flag, only causes wrapping to occur between words rather than through them.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Print all /etc/passwd lines with duplicated uid
Prints all the lines in /etc/passwd belonging to users with a duplicated uid. It also adds the hostname to the beginning of the line. It's been tested in AIX, Solaris and Linux.

FInd the 10 biggest files taking up disk space
This combines the above two command into one. Note that you can leave off the last two commands and simply run the command as "find /home/ -type f -exec du {} \; 2>/dev/null | sort -n | tail -n 10" The last two commands above just convert the output into human readable format.


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