Commands by ideivid (3)

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Run a command when a file is changed

Show CPU usage for EACH cores

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Determine command type (alias, keyword, function, builtin, or file)
Prints a string indicating whether a command is an alias, keyword, function, builtin, or file. I have used this in my BASH scripts to allow an external parameter to define which function to run, and ensure that it is a valid function that can indeed be run.

TCPDUMP & Save Capture to Remote Server w/ GZIP
NOTE: When opening the files you might need to strip the very top line with notepad++ as its a mistake header This is useful when the local machine where you need to do the packet capture with tcpdump doesn?t have enough room to save the file, where as your remote host does tcpdump -i eth0 -w - | ssh forge.remotehost.com -c arcfour,blowfish-cbc -C -p 50005 "cat - | gzip > /tmp/eth0.pcap.gz" Your @ PC1 doing a tcpdump of PC1s eth0 interface and its going to save the output @ PC2 who is called save.location.com to a file /tmp/eth0-to-me.pcap.gz again on PC2 More info @: http://www.kossboss.com/linuxtcpdump1

Change host name
With sed you can replace strings on the fly.

resume other user's screen session via su, without pty error
Normally, if you su to another user from root and try to resume that other user's screen session, you will get an error like "Cannot open your terminal '/dev/pts/0' - please check." This is because the other user doesn't have permission for root's pty. You can get around this by running a "script" session as the new user, before trying to resume the screen session. Note you will have to execute each of the three commands separately, not all on the same line as shown here. Credit: I found this at http://www.hjackson.org/blog/archives/2008/11/29/cannot-open-your-terminal-dev-pts-please-check.

alias to close terminal with :q
Put this in your ~/.bashrc file (or the equivalent) If you use vim a lot, this alias will be immediately obvious. Your brain will thank you.

Resume aborted scp file transfers
Put it into your sh startup script (I use alias scpresume='rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh' in bash). When a file transfer via scp has aborted, just use scpresume instead of scp and rsync will copy only the parts of the file that haven't yet been transmitted.

!* Tells that you want all of the *arguments* from the previous command to be repeated in the current command
Example: touch file{1,2,3}; chmod 777 !*


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