Commands by igorfu (10)

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creeate file named after actual date
Create a file with actual date as filename

Uniquely (sort of) color text so you can see changes
Colorify colors input by converting the text to a number and then performing modulo 7 on it. This resulting number is used as the color escape code. This can be used to color the results of commands with complex outputs (like "482279054165371") so if any of the digits change, there's a good chance the color will change too. I say good chance because there's only 7 unique colors here, so assuming you were watching random numbers, there would be a 6/7 chance that the color would change when the number changed. This should really only be used to help quickly identify when things change, but should not be the only thing relied upon to positively assert that an output has not changed.

find out which directories in /home have the most files currently open

Replace spaces in a filename with hyphens
As long as you have perl based rename. You can check: =$ rename --help Unknown option: help Usage: rename [-v] [-n] [-f] perlexpr [filenames] That's the good one.

find the rpm package name that provides a specific file
For Linux distributions using rpm (eg Mandriva), this command will find the rpm package name that provides a file.

Determine status of a RAID write-intent bitmap
Report information about a bitmap file.

Find the package that installed a command

Fill up disk space (for testing)
Put into some file. No special purpouse, just for fun...

Add forgotten changes to the last git commit
It's pretty common to forgot to commit a files, be it a modification, or a brand new file. If you did forget something, git add the files you want, and then git commit --amend. It will essentially redo the last commit, with the changes you just added. It seeds the commit message with the last commit message by default. You probably shouldn't do this if you've already pushed the commit.

Create an alias, store it in ~/.bash_aliases and source your new alias into the ~/.bashrc
This is useful if you use a shell with a lot of other users. You will be able to run "topu" to see your running processes instead of the complete 'top -u username'. Read more on alias: http://man.cx/alias


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