Commands by illia (1)

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Print all open regular files sorted by the number of file handles open to each.
This command run fine on my Ubuntu machine, but on Red Hat I had to change the awk command to `awk '{print $10}'`.

Create multiple mp4 files using avidemux
Convert multiple files using avidemux. Version updated (thanks to the guys who helped me giving me hints about how to improve the command). Works with files whose name contains blank characters. One of the reasons why I love open source: everyone can take something "done" and improve it to make it better! If u have suggestions, please let me know.

Scroll up (or Down (PgDn)) in any terminal session (except KDE)

Leap year calculation

Get duration of an audio file in seconds.
This is an alternative to #9131. ffmpeg didn't work on my .au files, though it did on the .wav ones. Also useful if you don't have ffmpeg but do have sox. Handily, sox already reports in seconds (decimal).

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Remove spaces from filenames - through a whole directory tree.
Sometimes, you don't want to just replace the spaces in the current folder, but through the whole folder tree - such as your whole music collection, perhaps. Or maybe you want to do some other renaming operation throughout a tree - this command's useful for that, too. To rename stuff through a whole directory tree, you might expect this to work: for a in `find . -name '* *'`;do mv -i "$a" ${a// /_};done No such luck. The "for" command will split its parameters on spaces unless the spaces are escaped, so given a file "foo bar", the above would not try to move the file "foo bar" to "foo_bar" but rather the file "foo" to "foo", and the file "bar" to "bar". Instead, find's -execdir and -depth arguments need to be used, to set a variable to the filename, and rename files within the directory before we rename the directory. It has to be -execdir and won't work with just -exec - that would try to rename "foo bar/baz quux" to "foo_bar/baz_quux" in one step, rather than going into "foo bar/", changing "baz quux" to "baz_quux", then stepping out and changing "foo bar/" into "foo_bar/". To rename just files, or just directories, you can put "-type f" or "-type d" after the "-depth" param. You could probably safely replace the "mv" part of the line with a "rename" command, like rename 'y/ /_/' *, but I haven't tried, since that's way less portable.

lsof - cleaned up for just open listening ports, the process, and the owner of the process
another formatting/oneliner for lsof User - Process - Port

Vectorize xkcd strips
Uses ImageMagick and potrace to vectorize the input image, with parameters optimized for xkcd-like pictures.

url shortner using google's shortner api
First get a api key for google url shortner from here https://developers.google.com/url-shortener/ Then replace the API_KEY in the command


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