Commands by ilyxa (2)

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Pipe STDOUT to vim
The hyphen tells vim to open from STDOUT - saves having to create temporary files.

create a progress bar...
A simple way yo do a progress bar like wget.

Connect to remote machine with other enconding charset

Find out when your billion-second anniversary is (was). (on OS X)
This is the same command as this one, but for OS X. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3053/find-out-when-your-billion-second-anniversary-is-was.

View any already in progress copy command in detail
If you spot a dubious looking cp command running you can use this command to view what is being copied and to where. 1234 is the PID of the cp command being passed to the lsof utility. 3r.*REG will display the file/directory that is being read/copied. 4w.*REG will display the destination it is being written to.

Rename files in batch

diff directories, quick cut and paste to view the changes
We use this to quickly highlight differences and provide a quick way to cut and paste the command to view the files using the marvellous vimdiff

Find status of all symlinks
The symlinks command can show status of all symbolic links, including which links are dangling, which symlinks point to files on other file systems, which symlinks use ../ more than necessary, which symlinks are messy (e.g. having too many slashes or dots), etc. Other useful things it can do include removing all dangling links (-d) and converting absolute links to relative links (-c). The path given must be an absolute path (which is why I used $(pwd) in the example command).

recursively change file name from uppercase to lowercase (or viceversa)
easier way to recursively change files to lowercase using rename instead

Find the package that installed a command


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