Commands by imjoseangel (6)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

find which of the zip files contains the file you're searching for
This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived. It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need. To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files. Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.

geoip information
Show external IP and geolocation information. Primary feature is the use of tee to echo IP _and_ send to geoiplookup command...Use IP as input for as many commands as you want with more >( [command] ) Thanks to http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/6334/ Requires MaxMind DB and geoiplookup tool. Sample output has IP obfuscated on first line, lines 2-4 from having MaxMind Country && MaxMind City DBs installed

List all files ever added in git repository

grep certain file types recursively
-exec works better and faster then using a pipe

print all except first collumn

Convert JSON to YAML
Requires installing json2yaml via npm: npm install -g json2yaml (can also pipe from stdin) Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/json2yaml

Print number of mb of free ram
This will show the amount of physical RAM that is left unused by the system.

list all executables in your path
If run in bash, this will display all executables that are in your current $PATH

easy C shell math calculators
allows simple C shell access to the power of bc - never could figure out how to do the same thing with Bash - that's why I use tcsh most of the time.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: