Commands by intuited (4)

  • Doesn't display the matching line. If you want that behaviour, you need to add "print && " before the 'exit'.


    0
    <command> | perl -pe '/<regex/ && exit;'
    intuited · 2009-12-22 15:05:49 0
  • "Copying" things to the X clipboard doesn't normally create a copy. Rather the data to be 'copied' is referenced. This means that if the application that you 'copied' stuff from is closed, that data is lost. If the application that you 'copied' from is suspended with CTRL-Z, there could be some issues if you try to paste it into something. This command will create a copy of referenced data and have xclip be the provider of it, so you can then go ahead and close the app that contains the original information. Caveat: I'm not sure if this is binary-safe (though i would expect it to be), and don't know what would happen if you used it to clip a 20 meg gimp image. This technique becomes more convenient if you set it up as an action in a clipboard manager (eg klipper, parcellite). Some of these applets can take automatic action based on a variety of parameters, so you could probably just get it to always own the clipped data whenever data is clipped.


    4
    xclip -o -selection clipboard | xclip -selection clipboard
    intuited · 2009-12-21 19:02:43 1
  • Manpages, command summaries, and pretty much everything else usually have the information you're most likely to want at the beginning. Seeing just the last 40 or so lines of options from a command that has 100 is not super useful, and having to scroll up each time you want to glance at something is spastic. Run this and then do something like p do vi --help and you'll get the first screen(-mostly-)full of vi's usage info and options list Then use p d to page down, and p u to page up. To see the current page again: p r Also useful for situations like p do aptitude search ~dsmorgasbord p next #p sudo aptitude -r install libwickedawesome-perl-snoochieboochies p next p sudo aptitude -r install libwickedawesome-perl-snoochieboochies snazztasticorama-dev-v0.&#8734; where you're using readline up-arrow, HOME, END, etc., to quickly recall commented commands. For the unaware, that option to aptitude search will bring up all of the packages whose descriptions contain the string "smorgasbord". Depending on your distro, there could potentially be hundreds of them.


    0
    p() { l=$LINES; case $1 in do) shift; IFS=$'\n' _pg=( $("$@") ) && _pgn=0 && p r;; r) echo "${_pg[*]:_pgn:$((l-4))}";; d) (( _pgn+=l-4 )); (( _pgn=_pgn>=${#_pg[@]}?${#_pg[@]}-l+4:_pgn )); p r;; u) (( _pgn=_pgn<=l-4?0:_pgn-$l-4 )); p r;; esac; }
    intuited · 2009-12-18 23:35:53 3
  • Assuming that $script contains the filename of a script you'd like to post as part of a comment on this site, this will prefix each line with '$' and pipe it into the X selection. From there just put the cursor in the right place in the comments box and middle-click. Should work pretty much anywhere with xclip installed. On debian-ish systems this is installed as part of the package "xclip".


    2
    sed 's/^/$ /' "$script" | xclip
    intuited · 2009-09-13 11:21:54 1

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Print one . instead of each line
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Create colorized html file from Vim or Vimdiff
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A little bash daemon =)
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Copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local machine
This command will copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local one. Ensure you are in the local directory you want to populate with the remote files before running the command. To copy a directory and it's contents, you could: $ ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/a/directory ; tar cvf - ./targetdir)" | tar xvf - This is especially useful on *nix'es that don't have 'scp' installed by default.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

DVD ripping with ffmpeg
To rip DVD movie to ogg format using ffmpeg, follow these steps. 1) find the vob files on the mounted video DVD in VIDEO_TS that stores the movie itself. There would be a few other VOB files that stores splash screen or special features, the vob files for the movie itself can be identified by its superior size. You can verify these vob files by playing them directly with a player (e.g. mplayer) 2) concatenate all such vob files, pipe to ffmpeg 3) calculate the video size and crop size. The ogg video size must be multiple of 16 on both width and height, this is inherit limitation of theora codec. In my case I took 512x384. The -vcodec parameter is necessary because ffmpeg doesn't support theora by itself. -acodec is necessary otherwise ffmpeg uses flac by default.

A little bash daemon =)
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Find chronological errors or bad timestamps in a Subversion repository
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List last opened tabs in firefox browser


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