Commands by ira34 (0)

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Look for English words in /dev/urandom
* to get the English dictionary: wget http://www.mavi1.org/web_security/wordlists/webster-dictionary.txt

grep -v with multiple patterns.
Use multiple patterns with grep -v. So you can print all lines in a file except those containing the multiple patterns you specify.

Identify long lines in a file
This command displays a list of lines that are longer than 72 characters. I use this command to identify those lines in my scripts and cut them short the way I like it.

Query Wikipedia via console over DNS

Rename files in batch

remove hostname from known_hosts

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

calulate established tcp connection of local machine

Add SVN keywords property to all PHP and Javascript files

a find and replace within text-based files, to locate and rewrite text en mass.
syntax follows regular command line expression. example: let's say you have a directory (with subdirs) that has say 4000 .php files. All of these files were made via script, but uh-oh, there was a typo! if the typo is "let's go jome!" but you meant it to say "let's go home!" find . -name "*.php" | xargs perl -pi -e "s/let\'s\ go\ jome\!/let\'s\ go\ home\!/g" all better :) multiline: find . -name "*.php" | xargs perl -p0777i -e 's/knownline1\nknownline2/replaced/m' indescriminate line replace: find ./ -name '*.php' | xargs perl -pi -e 's/\".*$\"/\new\ line\ content/g'


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