Commands by isaacs (7)

  • Mouse around the title of this item, and note that your cookies are being logged to the console. If I were evil, I could instead send everyone's cookies to my site, and then post up-votes on all my submissions using their cookies, and try to delete every other submission, until clfu was completely pwned by me, redirecting people to malware and porn sites, and so on. Update - now fixed.


    6
    perl -pi -e 's/<a href="#" onmouseover="console.log('xss! '+document.cookie)" style="position:absolute;height:0;width:0;background:transparent;font-weight:normal;">xss</a>/<\/a>/g'
    isaacs · 2009-07-08 22:26:15 5
  • There's probably a more efficient way to do this rather than the relatively long perl program, but perl is my hammer, so text processing looks like a nail. This is of course a lot to type all at once. You can make it better by putting this somewhere: clf () { (curl -d "[email protected]" http://www.commandlinefu.com/search/autocomplete 2>/dev/null) | egrep 'autocomplete|votes|destination' | perl -pi -e 's/<a style="display:none" class="destination" href="//g;s/<[^>]*>//g;s/">$/\n\n/g;s/^ +|\([0-9]+ votes,//g;s/^\//http:\/\/commandlinefu.com\//g'; } Then, to look up any command, you can do this: clf diff This is similar to http://www.colivre.coop.br/Aurium/CLFUSearch except that it's just one line, so more in the spirit of CLF, in my opinion. Show Sample Output


    1
    (curl -d q=grep http://www.commandlinefu.com/search/autocomplete) | egrep 'autocomplete|votes|destination' | perl -pi -e 's/a style="display:none" class="destination" href="//g;s/<[^>]*>//g;s/">$/\n\n/g;s/^ +//g;s/^\//http:\/\/commandlinefu.com\//g'
    isaacs · 2009-07-08 22:10:49 4
  • Pipe any command through figlet to make the output more awesome. Example: ls | figlet Show Sample Output


    25
    command | figlet
    isaacs · 2009-05-03 21:20:46 3
  • Get the svn info, grep for the "URL" of the repository, pull out the tag/branch/trunk, and then just show the helpful/meaningful bit. Show Sample Output


    2
    svn info | grep '^URL:' | egrep -o '(tags|branches)/[^/]+|trunk' | egrep -o '[^/]+$'
    isaacs · 2009-04-09 20:08:45 1
  • If you put this in your .bashrc, you might also want to add this to make it use the colors by default: alias ls="ls --color=auto"


    -2
    eval "`dircolors -b`"
    isaacs · 2009-03-27 05:37:04 1
  • This is useful for piping to other commands, as well: svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | egrep -o '[^MA\ ].*$' | xargs $EDITOR


    0
    svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | egrep -o '[^MA\ ].*$'
    isaacs · 2009-03-27 05:18:24 2
  • I got really tired of having tree always show me tons of .svn and .git stuff that I don't care about. With this alias, "tree" uses pretty colors, snazzy line graphics, and ignores any source control and package mumbojumbo. (Customize the *.*.package glob, of course.) Show Sample Output


    7
    alias tree="tree -CAFa -I 'CVS|*.*.package|.svn|.git' --dirsfirst"
    isaacs · 2009-03-27 05:13:39 0

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This one liner takes the shell code that you can grab off of the web and disassemble it into readable assembly so you can validate the code does what it says, before using it. The shell code in the above example is from http://www.shell-storm.org/shellcode/files/shellcode-623.php You can replace "-s intel" with "-s att" to get AT&T format disassembly.

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