Commands by iynaix (1)

  • Takes the same arguments that ack does. E.g. ack-open -i "searchterm" opens all files below the current directory containing the search term. The search term is also highlighted within vim if you have hlsearch set. Works on zsh, unsure if it works on bash. Note: ubuntu users have to change ack to ack-grep unless you already have it aliased (as I do)


    1
    ack-open () { local x="$(ack -l $* | xargs)"; if [[ -n $x ]]; then eval vim -c "/$*[-1] $x"; else echo "No files found"; fi }
    iynaix · 2011-10-04 08:56:18 0

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