Commands by j0rg3 (0)

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MSDOS command to check existance of command and exit batch if failed
This is a command to be used inside of MS-DOS batch files to check existence of commands as preconditions before actual batch processing can be started. If the command is found, batch script continues execution. If not, a message is printed on screen, script then waits for user pressing a key and exits. An error message of the command itself is suppressed for clarity purpose.

Bitcoin prices from the command line

keep an eye on system load changes
helps you keep watch on the load of a system, without having to stare constantly at the terminal. The -d argument to watch highlights the difference from the last run, making it easier to note how the load is fluctuating. The sed command just strips off the information about how long the box has been up, and how many users are logged in.

Extract title from HTML files
previous version leaves lots of blank lines

Remove last line from files recursively
Used this command recently to remove the trailing ?> from all the files in a php project, which has having some unnecessary whitespace issues. Obviously, change *.php to whatever you'd like.

start a VNC server for another user

List all symbolic links in current directory
why go through the hard way? use find with -type l

Count the total amount of hours of your music collection
First the find command finds all files in your current directory (.). This is piped to xargs to be able to run the next shell pipeline in parallel. The xargs -P argument specifies how many processes you want to run in parallel, you can set this higher than your core count as the duration reading is mainly IO bound. The -print0 and -0 arguments of find and xargs respectively are used to easily handle files with spaces or other special characters. A subshell is executed by xargs to have a shell pipeline for each file that is found by find. This pipeline extracts the duration and converts it to a format easily parsed by awk. ffmpeg reads the file and prints a lot of information about it, grep extracts the duration line. cut and sed cut out the time information, and tr converts the last . to a : to make it easier to split by awk. awk is a specialized programming language for use in shell scripts. Here we use it to split the time elements in 4 variables and add them up.

change up n directories
Change n directories up, without parameters change one up

Find the package that installed a command


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