Commands by jetdillo (3)

  • I came up with this because I don't have a problem remembering the big major changes I made deep inside my tree for a specific feature or bugfix but always manage to forget the trivial stuff I tweaked or touched along the way that needs to get pushed as well. Show Sample Output


    0
    git status|awk '/modified:/ { printf("git add %s\n",$3) }; NF ==2 { printf("git add %s\n",$2) }'|sh
    jetdillo · 2012-09-03 00:09:04 1
  • Okay, commands like this are a bit of a personal peeve. awk(1) operates on a /pattern/ {action} paradigm and yet I see people leave out the /pattern/ portion of an awk command all the time, opting to use grep or sed instead. You'll save yourself some typing and time if you include the /pattern/ with your {action}.


    0
    ps wwwwuax|awk '/command/ { printf("kill -9 %s\n",$2) }'|/bin/sh
    jetdillo · 2012-08-14 21:44:38 1
  • Use this the next time you need to come up with a reasonably random bitstring, like for a WPA/WPA2 PSK or something. Takes a continuous stream of bytes coming from /dev/urandom, runs it through od(1), picking a random field ($0 and $1 excluded) from a random line and then prints it. Show Sample Output


    1
    cat /dev/urandom|od -t x1|awk 'NR > line { pos=int(rand()*15)+2;printf("%s",$pos);line=NR+(rand()*1000);digits = digits+2 } digits == 64 { print("\n");exit }'
    jetdillo · 2012-08-14 19:02:00 3

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Save your open windows to a file so they can be opened after you restart
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Mutt - Change mail sender.

exec chmod to subfiles
Using `-exec cmd {} +` causes find to build the command using all matching filenames before execution, rather than once per file.

Outputs a 10-digit random number

Command to logout all the users in one command
It's only to logout all other user's except "root"

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '

Add line number count as C-style comments
I often find the need to number enumerations and other lists when programming. With this command, create a new file called 'inputfile' with the text you want to number. Paste the contents of 'outputfile' back into your source file and fix the tabbing if necessary. You can also change this to output hex numbering by changing the "%02d" to "%02x". If you need to start at 0 replace "NR" with "NR-1". I adapted this from http://osxdaily.com/2010/05/20/easily-add-line-numbers-to-a-text-file/.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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