Commands by jlaunay (16)

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Periodically run a command without hangups, and send the output to your e-mail
Run "ps -x" (process status) in the background every hour (in this example). The outputs of both "nohup" and "ps -x" are sent to the e-mail (instead of nohup.out and stdout and stderr). If you like it, replace "ps -x" by the command of your choice, replace 3600 (1 hour) by the period of your choice. You can run the command in the loop any time by killing the sleep process. For example $ ps -x 2925 ? S 0:00.00 sh -c unzip E.zip >/dev/null 2>&1 11288 ? O 0:00.00 unzip E.zip 25428 ? I 0:00.00 sleep 3600 14346 pts/42- I 0:00.01 bash -c while true; do ps -x | mail pascalv; sleep 3600; done 643 pts/66 Ss 0:00.03 -bash 14124 pts/66 O+ 0:00.00 ps -x $ kill 25428 You have mail in /mail/pascalv

Convert .flv to .avi

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Perl one-liner to determine number of days since the Unix epoch
There are some environments that use this value for password and account expiration. It's helpful to be able to quickly determine the number of days since the Unix epoch (dse) when working directly with the configuration files as an administrator.

Show the command line for a PID with ps
Show the command line for a PID with ps

export iPad App list to txt file
This will generate the same output without changing the current directory, and filepath will be relative to the current directory. Note: it will (still) fail if your iTunes library is in a non-standard location.

mplayer -af scaletempo
Pitch-correct play speed with mplayer. You can also use [] and {} keys to change play speed on-the-fly.

list files recursively by size

List all files modified by a command
Often you run a command, but afterwards you're not quite sure what it did. By adding this prefix/suffix around [COMMAND], you can list any files that were modified. . Take a nanosecond timestamp: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.NNNNNNNNN $ date "+%F %T.%N" . Find any files that have been modified since that timestamp: $ find . -newermt "$D" . This command currently only searches below the current directory. If you want to look elsewhere change the find parameter, e.g. $ find /var/log . -newermt "$D"

coloured shell prompt
This coloured prompt will show: username in green, grey "@" sign, hostname in red, current directory in yellow, typed commands in green.


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