Commands by johnebgood (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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full path listing in /directory/path/* of javascript files.
file listing in /directory/path/* of specific files such as javascript(js) .

commit message generator - whatthecommit.com

Edit the /etc/sudoers config file the right way.
'visudo' is installed by default on most Unix-like systems. If not installed, you can get it from the 'sudo' package. 'visudo' will use the text editor found in your $EDITOR variable, whether it's vi, vim, emacs, nano or gedit. After making changes to the /etc/sudoers file, visudo will check for syntax errors, and notify you of them. This is better than 'vi /etc/sudoers', because of this capability. Rule #1 of system administration- if there is a tool that exists for editing config files, use the tool.

Countdown Clock
The biggest advantage over atoponce's nifty original is not killing the scrollback. Written assuming bash, but shouldn't be terribly difficult to port to other shells. S should be multiple spaces, but I can't get commandlinefu to save/show them properly, any help?

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

Show Shared Library Mappings
shows which shared lib files are pointed to by the dynamic linker.

Recursively create a TAGS file for an entire source tree. TAGS files are useful for editors like Vim and Emacs

Graphically show percent of mount space used
Automatically drops mount points that have non-numeric sizes (e.g. /proc). Tested in bash on Linux and AIX.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Cleanup Docker
# Delete all containers docker rm $(docker ps -a -q) # Delete all images docker rmi $(docker images -q)


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