Commands by johnlane (1)

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Check if a command is available in your system
Usefull to detect if a commad that your script relies upon is properly installed in your box, you can use it as a function function is_program_installed() { type "$1" >/dev/null } Invoke it and check the execution code is_program_installed "dialog" if [ ! $? -eq 0 ]; then echo "dialog is not installed" exit 1 fi

Display which distro is installed
Works on nearly all linux distros

check open ports without netstat or lsof

How to estimate the storage size of all files not named *.[extension] on the current directory
With this sentence we can estimate the storage size of all files not named *.jpg on the current directory. The syntax is based on Linux, for Unix compliance use: find ./* -prune ! -name '*.jpg' -ls |awk '{TOTAL+=$7} END {print int(TOTAL/(1024^2))"MB"}' We can change the jpg extension for whatever extension what we need

KDE Mixer Master Mute/Unmute
arguably better than using the driver interface. lots of potentially cool stuff to be done w/ the dcop client.

move contents of the current directory to the parent directory, then remove current directory.
Robust means of moving all files up by a directory. Will handle dot files, filenames containing spaces, and filenames with almost any printable characters. Will not handle filenames containing a single-quote (but if you are moving those, it's time to go yell at whoever created them in the first place).

IBM AIX: Extract a .tar.gz archive in one shot
This command is for UNIX OSes that have plain vanilla System V UNIX commands instead of their more functional GNU counterparts, such as IBM AIX.

print code 3-up and syntax-highlighted for easy beach-time study
This is the setup I'm using for my largest project. It gives 357 lines per page (per side), which makes it fairly easy to carry around a significant amount of code on a few sheets of paper. Try it. (I stick to the 80 column convention in my coding. For wider code, you'll have to adjust this.)

Convert Squid unixtime logs in human-readable ones
On-the-fly conversion of Unix Time to human-readable in Squid's access.log

Put a console clock in top right corner
Gives not only date but also some interesting status about the System


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