Commands by jonavon (4)

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Create named LUKS encrypted volume
You need to be root to do this. So check the command before running it. You enter the same password for Enter LUKS passphrase: Verify passphrase: Enter passphrase for /dev/loopn: ___ You can then copy the .img file to somewhere else. Loop it it with losetup -f IMAGENAME.img and then mount it with a file manager (eg nemo) or run mount /dev/loopn /media/mountfolder Acts similar to a mounted flash drive

Convert a date to timestamp
Simple way to get a timestamp from a date

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Create subversion undo point
Allows you to save progress without committing. To revert to an undo point, svn revert then apply the undo point with patch. $ svn revert -R . && patch -p0 < .undo/2009-03-27_08:08:11rev57 Similar: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/373/archive-all-files-containing-local-changes-svn

Function to change prompt
Bash function to change your default prompt to something simpler and restore it to normal afterwards.

Backup files incremental with rsync to a NTFS-Partition
This will backup the _contents_ of /media/SOURCE to /media/TARGET where TARGET is formatted with ntfs. The --modify-window lets rsync ignore the less accurate timestamps of NTFS.

Read the output of a command into the buffer in vim
This will append the output of "command" to whatever file you're currently editing in vim. Who else has good vim tricks? :)

check open ports without netstat or lsof

recursive search and replace old with new string, inside files
recursively traverse the directory structure from . down, look for string "oldstring" in all files, and replace it with "newstring", wherever found also: $ grep -rl oldstring . |xargs perl -pi~ -e 's/oldstring/newstring'

restore the contents of a deleted file for which a descriptor is still available
Note that the file at the given path will have the contents of the (still) deleted file, but it is a new file with a new node number; in other words, this restores the data, but it does not actually "undelete" the old file. I posted a function declaration encapsulating this functionality to http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/7yx6f/how_to_undelete_any_open_deleted_file_in_linux/c07sqwe (please excuse the crap formatting).


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