Commands by jonavon (2)

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Sum size of files returned from FIND

Simple top directory usage with du flips for either Linux or base Solaris
No need to type out the full OR clause if you know which OS you're on, but this is easy cut-n-paste or alias to get top ten directories by singleton. To avoid the error output from du -xSk you could always 2>/dev/null but you might miss relevant STDERR.

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

pip install into current directory without virtualenv
For subsequent commands in the prefixed path: $ PYTHONPATH=$PWD/lib/python*/site-packages ./bin/pip --version

Check whether IPv6 is enabled
Checks whether IPv6 is enabled system-wide by reading from procfs.

Recursively grep thorugh directory for string in file.
Print line numbers also, so you don't have to search through the files once its open for the string you already grepped for.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Reuse all parameter of the previous command line
!* is all of the arguments to the previous command rather than just the last one. This is useful in many situations. Here's a simple example: $ vi cd /stuff oops! [exit vi, twice] $ !* expands to: cd /stuff

Broadcast your shell thru UDP on port 5000
Better solution in case of many clients, imo.

Display error pages in report format
This command will return a full list of Error 404 pages in the given access log. The following variables have been given to awk Hostname ($2), ERROR Code ($9), Missing Item ($7), Referrer ($11) You can then send this into a file (>> /path/to/file), which you can open with OpenOffice as a CSV


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