Commands by jonty (6)

  • If you spend all day editing in vi then switching your fingers to Emacs mode just for the command line can be difficult. Use set -o vi in your bash shell and enjoy the power of a real editor.


    1
    set -o vi; ls -l jnuk<ESC>bCjunk
    jonty · 2009-02-05 22:58:51 1
  • Einstein's razor: As simple as possible, but not simpler. On the destination machine netcat listens on any port (1234 in the example) and sends anything it receives into a file or pipe. On the source machine a separate netcat takes input from a file or pipe and sends it over the network to the listener. This is great between machines on a LAN where you don't care about authentication, encryption, or compression and I would recommend it for being simpler than anything else in this situation. Over the internet you should use something with better security.


    3
    (on destination machine) nc -l 1234 > whatever; (on source machine) nc destination 1234 < whatever;
    jonty · 2009-02-05 21:35:08 1
  • At some point you want to know what packets are flowing on your network. Use tcpdump for this. The man page is obtuse, to say the least, so here are some simple commands to get you started. -n means show IP numbers and don't try to translate them to names. -l means write a line as soon as it is ready. -i eth0 means trace the packets flowing through the first ethernet interface. src or dst w.x.y.z traces only packets going to or from IP address w.x.y.z. port 80 traces only packets for HTTP. proto udp traces only packets for UDP protocol. Once you are happy with each option combine them with 'and' 'or' 'not' to get the effects you want.


    2
    tcpdump -nli eth0; tcpdump -nli eth0 src or dst w.x.y.z; tcpdump -nli eth0 port 80; tcpdump -nli eth0 proto udp
    jonty · 2009-02-05 17:41:55 1
  • If you are already running screen then you often want to start a command in a fresh window. You use this alias by typing 's whatever' from your command line and 'whatever' starts running in a new window. Good with interactive commands like info, vim, and nethack.


    18
    alias s='screen -X screen'; s top; s vi; s man ls;
    jonty · 2009-02-05 13:47:14 2
  • Fool date by setting the timezone out by 24 hours and you get yesterday's date. Try TZ=XYZ-24 to get tomorrow's date. I live in TZ=GMT0BST so you might need to shift the number 24 by the hours in your timezone.


    1
    TZ=XYZ24 date
    jonty · 2009-02-05 13:27:14 3
  • I find this handy for linking all the bin files in a package to /usr/bin or all the man files to /usr/share/man. You can replace * with */* to operate on all the files in subdirectories.


    0
    cd /this/directory; for f in *; do ln -s `pwd`/$f /that/directory; done
    jonty · 2009-02-05 13:21:16 1

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Recursively create a TAGS file for an entire source tree. TAGS files are useful for editors like Vim and Emacs

Display current time in requested time zones.
The time zone names come from the tz database which is usually found at /usr/share/zoneinfo.

Display a list of RPMs installed on a particular date
Find out which RPMs were installed on a particular date. These would (naturally) include update RPMs. This example shows searching for "Thu 05 Mar" (with grep). Alternatively, pipe it to less so you can search inside less (with less's neat text highlighting of the search term): rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | less # (this example) search term: Thu 05 Mar

grep across a git repo and open matching files in gedit

Grep by paragraph instead of by line.
This is a command that I find myself using all the time. It works like regular grep, but returns the paragraph containing the search pattern instead of just the line. It operates on files or standard input. $ grepp or $ | grepp

Record live sound in Vorbis (eg for bootlegs or to take audio notes)
This will record the capture channel of your soundcard, directly encoded in Ogg Vorbis, in stereo at quality 5 (I'm using this to record live jam sessions from my line input). You can choose which device to capture (eg. line input, microphone or PCM output) with $ alsamixer -V capture You can do the same thing and live encode in MP3 or FLAC if you wish, just check FLAC and LAME man pages.

find and remove old compressed backup files
remove all compressed files in /home/ folder not created in the last 10 days

Display which distro is installed
Works on nearly all linux distros

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments. This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

Show sorted list of files with sizes more than 1MB in the current dir
no fancy grep stuff here.


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