Commands by jors (0)

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combine `mkdir foo && cd foo` into a single function `mcd foo`
I find that I create a directory and then cd into that directory quite often. I found this little function on the internets somewhere and thought I'd share it. Just copy-paste it into you ~/.bash_profile and then `source ~/.bash_profile`.

To get the CPU temperature continuously on the desktop
There is no need for variables. I also added sleep to reduce cpu usage, however I didn't test it.

translates acronyms for you
very handy if you are in irc and absolutely don't know what these guys are talking about. this is a netbsd command, if you are lucky it exists in your distro's package database.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Open a manpage in the default (graphical) web browser
An easy alias for opening a manpage, nicely HTML formatted, in your set internet browser. If you get a "command exited with status 3" error you need to install groff.

Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)
Finds duplicates based on MD5 sum. Compares only files with the same size. Performance improvements on: $find -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate The new version takes around 3 seconds where the old version took around 17 minutes. The bottle neck in the old command was the second find. It searches for the files with the specified file size. The new version keeps the file path and size from the beginning.

Suspend to ram
Using sys

prevent large files from being cached in memory (backups!)
We all know... $ nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   $ ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do $ cachedel   To check the cache status of a file, do $ cachestats

Better recursive grep with pretty colors... requires ruby and gems (run: "gem install rak")

Terminal - Show directories in the PATH, one per line with sed and bash3.X `here string'
another method : awk '{gsub(/:/, "\n");print}'


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